Disaster Relief & Public Safety: CLASSY Awards Top 5

Disaster Relief & Public Safety: CLASSY Awards Top 5

Facebook Twitter Linkedin

Disaster Relief & Community Safety programs address the problems that plague the global neighborhood, addressing issues that range from missing persons, unintentional injuries and domestic violence to providing supplies, medical care, food, infrastructure and volunteers to help in the immediate aftermath of a disaster. View the key indicators of this subcategory here.


Mobile Medical Disaster Relief
NYCMedics
WHAT THEY’RE ADDRESSING The 14 million people who did not have access to medical services in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. Specifically the remote, isolated, difficult to access communities that were not able to seek assistance; communities that would not have received critical services within the narrow time frame that, when missed, may be a matter of life or death.
Mobile Medical Disaster Relief
Program Name

East Samar, Philippines
Location

2005
Start date

Katherine Bequary
Program Director

@nycmedics

Mobile Medical Disaster Relief’s specialty is accessing the inaccessible, hard-to-reach neglected areas, providing lifesaving medical care and connecting communities to ongoing relief efforts. The mobile medical teams provide emergency medical care, stabilization and medical evacuation, caring for everything from life threatening injuries to secondary, as well as psycho-social ailments to chronic illness. For the Philippines, Mobile Medical used a Solar Suitcase, equipped with a fetal doppler that was used for solar power generation and during remote medical clinics. Efficient use of resources allows NYCMedics to put volunteers into the field for just $80 day, meaning that on average they can medically intervene in someone’s life for just $4. This model addresses an unmet need in disaster relief efforts, especially in reaching remote, isolated communities, identifying the specific needs of each community and collaborating with and supporting local efforts. In the Philippines NYCM treated more than 1,000 infected wounds, of which more than half required minor surgical intervention. LEARN MORE.

Our ethos dictates that all people have the right to seek and receive medical care. Katherine Bequary, Program Director
In the Philippines, NYCM treated more than 1,000 infected wounds, of which more than half required minor surgical intervention.

In the Philippines, NYCM treated more than 1,000 infected wounds, of which more than half required minor surgical intervention.

 

 

First Responders: Emergency Response & Health Care
International Medical Corps
WHAT THEY’RE ADDRESSING Afghanistan has been in the grip of conflict and instability for more than 35 years. Afghans have one of the lowest life expectancies and highest infant mortality rates in the world. One of every four Afghan children dies before his or her first birthday. Safety, security, and access to basic services continue to be paramount issues facing the Afghan people.
First Responders
Program Name

Afghanistan
Location

1984
Start date

Rabih Torbay
Program Director

@IMC_Worldwide

The First Responders program is rooted in research on resiliency by the DfID: build local capacity in Afghanistan so the community can meet their own needs instead of relying on external assistance. They specifically focus on providing the tools to meet every day health care needs, such as nutrition, child birth and childhood illnesses to reduce their vulnerability to external shocks. First Responders trains women through pregnancy, childbirth and post-natal care. Students learn essential clinical skills: how to perform an antenatal exam, manage severe hypertension, address life-threatening complications and resuscitate a newborn. Trained midwives work in community health posts, where each year, they can reach a total of 660,000 women who have few health care options. This 2-year, accredited program works in partnership with the Afghan Midwives Association and is ranked first in its field by the Afghanistan Ministry of Health. LEARN MORE.

A simple idea drove our first response—give people the skills to help themselves and the investment will last. Today, that once-innovate idea of building the capacity of communities to meet their health care needs is accepted as a culturally appropriate, economically efficient, and politically stabilizing way to deliver assistance. Rabih Torbay, Program Director

 

 

Haiti Program
Medair
WHAT THEY’RE ADDRESSING The two million people in Haiti that are thought to remain homeless or living in temporary shelters after the 2010 earthquake. Given the frequency of natural disasters (Hurricane Tomas in 2010, Tropical storm Isaac and Sandy in 2012), the Haitian people need secure shelters resilient to hurricanes and earthquakes.
Haiti Program
Program Name

Sud-Est Region, Haiti
Location

2010
Start date

Johan ten Hoeve
Program Director

@MedairInt

Directly after the 2010 quake, Medair responded by bringing in sturdy canvas tents with a fairly substantial skeleton. Families were very grateful to be out of the elements. But these shelters over weeks/months became inadequate. So Medair began to help families build more substantive “transitional shelters.” In the latest stage, they have begun building culturally appropriate permanent homes. The program’s strategy has since developed into a solid four-pronged approach: 1) Construction of safe and secure houses which are disaster resilient, 2) Train the construction workers regionally in improved construction techniques, 3) Introduce Disaster Risk Reduction techniques linked to land and water management, and 4) Provide water and improve sanitation facilities and train in healthy hygiene behaviors. LEARN MORE.

Our unique process combines the technical skills of professional architects trained in post-disaster reconstruction with the local knowledge of Haitian construction workers. The result is a construction process that produces culturally appropriate and safe/secure houses, the first of which most residence in the Sud-Est Region have ever lived in. Johan ten Hoeve, Program Director

 

 

Liter of Light
Liter of Light USA
WHAT THEY’RE ADDRESSING 20 million people in the Philippines suffer from energy poverty, a figure that swells after natural disasters, when normal routes to access energy are completely cut. Most relief comes from off the shelf, imported, and patented technologies that are too expensive to access without aid. When parts break, they cannot be repaired because the locals do not understand how these products work.
Liter of Light
Program Name

Phillippines
Location

2011
Start date

Illac Diaz
Program Director

@aliteroflight

Liter of (Day) Light is a two-step DIY affordable solar lighting system. Step 1 uses recycled plastic soda bottles, 10 milliliters of bleach, and distilled water to produce a 55-watt bulb that refracts sunlight to light homes, schools, and public centers. Step 2 trains cooperatives how to build night lighting systems using simple carpentry skills, local knowledge, and readily available materials. Empowered by their new daylights, women have built businesses, children can now study inside their homes, and families have saved significant amounts off their monthly electricity bills, which they can use to pay for other needs. Each Liter of Light has saved household US $10 off of their monthly electricity bills and 350 kilos of carbon emissions per year with the day and night light. LEARN MORE.

We’re building a grassroots movement that gives local entrepreneurs the knowledge, skills, and wisdom they need to thrive and help local communities to regain ownership of the technologies that improve their quality of life. By empowering people to become positive sources of change, we’re challenging them to come up with better ways to respond to a disaster before it strikes. Illac Diaz, Program Director

 

 

National Sexual Assault Online Hotline
RAINN (Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network)
WHAT THEY’RE ADDRESSING Every two minutes someone is sexually assaulted. Rape affects minors most often: 44% of victims are under the age of 18.
National Sexual Assault Online Hotline
Program Name

United States
Location

2006
Start date

Jennifer Marsh
Program Director

@RAINN01

RAINN recognized that the young demographic most likely to be affected by this crime was growing less likely to reach out via a traditional phone line. They needed to create a safe, secure space for victims/survivors to receive help from trained staff in an anonymous way. When developing the Online Hotline, RAINN consulted national technology, law and sexual assault service experts to develop a service and technology platform that could serve the unique needs of sexual assault survivors. The staff and user interface have been customized for privacy and crisis intervention services with features including session supervision capabilities, a catalog of hundreds of dashboard resources, and mobile enhancements. Recently, the Justice Department identified the Online Hotline as a model for using technology to serve victims of crime. LEARN MORE.

When I came to work on the Online Hotline I knew we were creating a service that would change the way that victims receive care. We have always strived to anticipate the needs of victims and provide services safely to ensure no survivors fall through the cracks. As a result, the hotline has continued to grow and adapt with survivors over the past 8 years. Jennifer Marsh, Program Director

 

 

The Disaster Relief & Public Safety Experts

The Leadership Council is an honorary board comprised of a diverse group of experts that will collectively determine the winners of the CLASSY Awards in this cause sector. Their unique perspective and valuable insight establishes this recognition as one of the highest honors in the social sector.

LC_disaster

 

 

 

Photo credit: Medair

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Current month ye@r day *